Fanuc servo drive integration

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12 Jun 2012 12:29 - 12 Jun 2012 13:27 #20837 by clkeck1
Well I hope I didn't just jump off a bridge without any water under it.

I just purchased a 1987 mori sl-4. I assumed it had a06b-6050 servo drives. Well under closer inspection they are a06b-6057.

I have used the 6050 drives before for the rotary table on my mill. But I don't have any info on the 6057 drives. Are these able to be integrated with emc? Are they analog input?

Thanks
cory
Last edit: 12 Jun 2012 13:27 by clkeck1.
The following user(s) said Thank You: Alloy Craft

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12 Jun 2012 14:00 #20840 by PCW
Replied by PCW on topic Fanuc servo drive integration
The whole name might help (theres a suffix like H202 after the 6057)
I think some of these drives are analog and some are digital

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12 Jun 2012 14:02 - 12 Jun 2012 14:21 #20841 by clkeck1
A06b-6050-h004
and
A06b-6050-h005
Last edit: 12 Jun 2012 14:21 by clkeck1.

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12 Jun 2012 15:16 #20844 by andypugh
clkeck1 wrote:

A06b-6050-h004
and
A06b-6050-h005


6050 or 6057?

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12 Jun 2012 16:22 #20847 by clkeck1
A06b-6057-h004
and
A06b-6057-h005

Please disregard the previous post
thinking about to many numbers

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12 Jun 2012 18:22 - 12 Jun 2012 18:28 #20851 by PCW
Replied by PCW on topic Fanuc servo drive integration
AFAICT those are digital drives. They seem to be rather simple (PWM and enable to drive (and fault data back on PWM pins), serial encoder data back from drive, but I have not been able to find any more specifications other than the connector pin-out and some one line interface decriptions.


support.ge-ip.com/support/index?page=doc...900112007ff7cf002fb2

Page 55 is the interface connector pinout
Last edit: 12 Jun 2012 18:28 by PCW. Reason: sp

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15 Jun 2012 04:51 #20944 by jmelson
clkeck1 wrote:

A06b-6057-h004
and
A06b-6057-h005

Please disregard the previous post
thinking about to many numbers

These sound like they are of the vintage that have serial pulse coders
on the motors. I have a prototype decoder for these, and a device
that converts the signal to quadrature, but at present provides no
commutation info for the drive. I'm working on that.

Jon

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15 Jun 2012 09:18 #20948 by andypugh
jmelson wrote:

These sound like they are of the vintage that have serial pulse coders
on the motors. I have a prototype decoder for these, and a device
that converts the signal to quadrature, but at present provides no
commutation info for the drive. I'm working on that.

In the interim it should be possible to use the bldc HAL component to read the quadrature pulses, perform a magnetic alignment and then generate commutation signals (Hall or Fanuc) for the drive.

What is the protocol for these encoders? If there is a way to get the serial data into HAL as an absolute postion then that can go straight into the bldc component to generate commutation signals.

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15 Jun 2012 11:30 #20953 by clkeck1
How much better are the digital drives than the analog? For simplicity reasons I may change out the drives and motor encoders for 6050 analog units so that I can stay into standard hardware/programing

Thanks
Cory

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15 Jun 2012 16:32 #20962 by jmelson
andypugh wrote:

In the interim it should be possible to use the bldc HAL component to read the quadrature pulses, perform a magnetic alignment and then generate commutation signals (Hall or Fanuc) for the drive.
[/quote]
No, without commutation info, BLDC would have no idea what poles to activate.
So, I don't think that will work.

What is the protocol for these encoders? If there is a way to get the serial data into HAL as an absolute postion then that can go straight into the bldc component to generate commutation signals.

It produces a 77-bit string of bits. There is a wide position readout that includes a field for
number of turns (signed) and a field for shaft position, such as 32768 or 65536 counts
(unsigned). It ends with a 5-bit CRC code to verify data quality.
If the encoder is an "incremental" encoder, it has no indication of position, and the
shaft angle value jumps suddenly to zero when it passes the index position for
the first time after power on. So, what they do is provide a backup battery in
the controller, and have brakes in the motor that assure the encoder cannot move
by even one count while powered off. The battery does not power the encoder, it
only powers a CMOS memory that holds the position count while the rest of the
encoder is not powered. This type of encoder could be used to derive commutation
info, but it would need a brake and backup battery, and if the memory was lost,
it would have to be hand-cranked one rev to pass the index pulse.

If the encoder is an "absolute" encoder, it also has a low-resolution field that
reports absolute position with 1024 counts/motor quadrant immediately at power on.
This could be used to derive commutation info without requiring a battery, and
the standard homing routine could pick up the index position. The encoder reader
would need to detect the appearance of the "homed" bit and prevent a servo trip at
that point due to the shift in count.

Jon

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