ANyone successfully installed LinuxCNC on a GMKtec G2?

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07 Mar 2024 16:20 #295414 by ckuecker
I bought a GMKtec G2 micro computer. Installed LinuxCNC. Axis running on a router with a Mesa 7I96s card running the steppers. Initial testing showed very good latency, but I somehow set something in the BIOS wrong, and now I get comm errors on starting LinuxCNC.

I'll try resetting the BIOS to defaults, but the big issue is I can not get the internal WiFi to be recognized by Linux. This really hurts, as I have no other access to the Internet in my workshop.

Any ideas on what I'm missing?

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07 Mar 2024 18:17 - 07 Mar 2024 18:19 #295422 by Mecanix
Yeah I have the same, The N100 I mean, different mfg/hardware though. Works flawlessly with Lcnc, one of my best shop computer in fact. Re your wifi, it's not uncommon to be required to manually install wifi interface drivers for linux so don't sweat it too much, easy fix that.

First thing first, see if it's running already or not. Never know.
$ sudo lshw -C network

If not, let us know what sort of interface chipset this came with and I'm sure someone will point you to the correct driver for it.
$ sudo lspci
Last edit: 07 Mar 2024 18:19 by Mecanix.
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07 Mar 2024 18:34 - 07 Mar 2024 18:44 #295424 by Mecanix

Yeah I have the same, The N100 I mean, different mfg/hardware though. 
 

Not to confuse here. I have the the same CPU (i.e, N100), which works great with Lcnc. Not the same hardware/unit. 

*IMPORTANT*
I've recently noticed a lot of those mini-boxes are surfacing and getting popular. However, pay attention here; most are engineered to cater the windows10/11 range of consumers when it comes to driver & bios support-wise, not Linux. It's paramount that you carry your research before getting one of those mini-pc, as in, investigate what sort of chipsets/hardware those are built with and ensure that linux drivers are made available for download by either the seller or the chipset mfg. 

I do recommend the industrial type of mini-pc over those fancy commercial ones. The bios and chipsets in those industrial pc are specifically engineered and selected to support linux rather than windows. Them just not as handsome and sexy, that's all... but them freakinwerk OOTB. 

e.g.

Last edit: 07 Mar 2024 18:44 by Mecanix.
The following user(s) said Thank You: tommylight, ckuecker

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10 Mar 2024 19:14 #295599 by blazini36
You should always look into upgrading the kernel when it comes to the wifi stuff. When a wifi chip comes out there will typically be attempts at making an open source driver, and this will generally be the way to get it working until it's pulled into the kernel.

For example I use an Ordoid H3 in almost everything, they don't have wifi so I use a dongle. This one I just did used an rtl8826 chip I think it was. The kernel that the LinuxCNC deb installs doesn't have the kernel module that supports this chip but the standard debian repos have a never rt kernel available. So I could have went through trying to find and build this driver, but all I actually had to do was install a kernel through apt that already has it.

The first step is to identify the wifi chip being used, try running lspci or lsusb depending on how it's connected, then go from there. It's typicaly not going to have anything to do with the bios

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