Emco 240 Tool Turret

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06 Jul 2017 21:12 - 06 Jul 2017 21:17 #95454 by Nerd
Nerd replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

Nerd wrote: 1.

Doesn't the drive switch to error mode once it can't move no further?

In a previous asnwer i said, turn the stepper motor driver lower in power, so it can fasten your lock system with a step over.
The adjustment of power of the stepper motor driver you can do with dip switches normally at the front.
A stepper motor driver is like hufter proof. They don't like cable problem's between motor and driver. And they don't like a
dc transformer that has been overfloaded by to high net current.

2.

Can't you replace the small pulley at motor side for a bigger one?

Yes, I used often use a 14mm shaft pulley belt with 22 teeth on the motor side. "T5-22-15-14"
In Linux you can adjust your rotary step's/revelution. I think it's called "Pitch" in Linux.

3.You can look for Andy's input's. We can learn about this.

4.In my mail i send a g code example like

G0 A50
G0 A-7

This code can be the basis for a Macro to lock your turret in place. 45 degrees is a 8 turret position machine.
So it's getting 5 degrees further and go's dan finally -2 degrees step over.


This kind of programming you can do incremental on the macro side. This make's everything easyer.
Last Edit: 06 Jul 2017 21:17 by Nerd.
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07 Jul 2017 08:20 #95465 by timmert
timmert replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

andypugh wrote: The carousel hal component can probably help with controlling your changer and interpreting the optos.

I think that you would need to configure as uni-directional and use carousel.N.motor-fwd to run the motor forwards and carousel.N.ready (rather than ...rev) to run the motor backwards to the pawl.

Do you know what the 10 wires on your motor are for?
There is a nice set of diagrams here, but only the 3-speed ones seem to have 10 wires.
www.practicalmachinist.com/vb/transforme...-connections-102289/

I don't have a spec sheet of the motor. I know it's a 2 speed 380V motor, and it got 10 wires. That's about it. I don't have any knowledge about electronics. So i think the easiest way to get this working is to replace the motor for a stepper motor like nerd suggested. And set it up as a A axis.
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07 Jul 2017 09:05 #95466 by andypugh
andypugh replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

timmert wrote: So i think the easiest way to get this working is to replace the motor for a stepper motor like nerd suggested. And set it up as a A axis.


How would you incorporate the opto-sensors into this scheme?

Are all the wires on the existing motor the same size?
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07 Jul 2017 09:17 #95468 by timmert
timmert replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret
I won't use the opto sensors. Each time when I start LinuxCNC I need to manually set the tool number according to turret position. Or I need to use a home sensor. I'm happy if the turret turns haha. Adding home sensors or making the opto sensors work isn't necessary at the beginning.


This is the the wiring of the stock motor.

The right terminal block got 2 wires connected
the left terminal block got 1 wire connect
I think these are for forward/reverse.
The block on the motor got 6 wires connected (cable numbers 1 to 6)





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07 Jul 2017 11:20 #95470 by andypugh
andypugh replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

timmert wrote: I won't use the opto sensors. Each time when I start LinuxCNC I need to manually set the tool number according to turret position

I think that is silly.

[/quote]

I think that might be a perfectly normal 3-phase motor (6-wires, dual voltage) with a temperature sensor and a brake.
Does the motor turn freely when not powered up?
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08 Jul 2017 14:51 #95505 by timmert
timmert replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret
motor turns freely
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08 Jul 2017 23:38 #95522 by andypugh
andypugh replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

timmert wrote: motor turns freely


Probably not a brake then.

I would expect to see 6 wires all the same size that are the ends of the 3-phase windings going to the 6-way connector block.

That block is fairly standard as a way to enable a motor to be wired "star" (Or Wye or Y) for 400V operation or "delta" (or ∆) for 200V operation.

They seem to have taken all 6 wires back to the controller, which suggest that they got the two speeds by running delta forwards and star backwards and re-arranging in the controller.

It ought to be fairly easy to achieve the same thing with a low-power VFD nowadays. I am not sure that doing that makes sense, but it would be simple to operate from LinuxCNC logic at least.
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09 Jul 2017 09:47 #95534 by timmert
timmert replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret
Hi Andy
Just to be sure...you mean if the motor turns freely when no power is on the motor?

There are 10 wires going back to the controller.
I checked the manuals for wiring information, but it's not in the manual.
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09 Jul 2017 15:30 #95546 by andypugh
andypugh replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret

timmert wrote: Hi Andy
Just to be sure...you mean if the motor turns freely when no power is on the motor?


Yes, the brakes are normally spring-applied and released by an applied voltage.

Can you measure the resistance between every wire and every other wire, that should give us some clues. (admittedly that's a lot of combinations)
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10 Jul 2017 22:33 - 10 Jul 2017 22:36 #95627 by Nerd
Nerd replied the topic: Emco 240 Tool Turret
This orginal Emco motor is a normally 3-phase motor i think. Bridging of the motor in Delta T is done in the controlling room of the Emco
You can use the orginal home print switches of the turret, but you need a "bit 0-7" logica to see where the turret position is. So you need al of the orginal sensor input.

If we have a I/O controller with plenty I/O it's a good hufter proof way to see where the turret position is.
But most of the sheep's here have only 5 input's to spend for the whole system with an old pc hihi.

A low power vdf turn's the turret like an grizly bear. So it's good to do this way, i agree, i unlike waiting to see the turret moving.
It's better like 1 second boomm. Ready to go for second tool. I wondering how Style machine's are doing this. Their software is like god for lathe.
Last Edit: 10 Jul 2017 22:36 by Nerd.
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