Torch Breakaway and Torch Pulse

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16 Jul 2020 00:00 #174786 by phillc54
I didn't know the pin name...
#net ohmic:type  <= motion.motion-type
#net ohmic:type  => ohmicsense.motion-type-in
net plasmac:motion-type => ohmicsense.motion-type-in

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16 Jul 2020 00:06 - 16 Jul 2020 00:07 #174788 by snowgoer540

I didn't know the pin name...
#net ohmic:type  <= motion.motion-type
#net ohmic:type  => ohmicsense.motion-type-in
net plasmac:motion-type => ohmicsense.motion-type-in


Thanks, as always. I need to find a way to mail you some metric-volume-measurement-units of beer, or start you a go-fund-me or something. :laugh:

I dont understand why we can get rid of the "ohmic:type". Every time I start to wrap my head around HAL, I get turned around. Also, Rod mentioned signals and pins. Stupid question, I'm sure, but how do you know which is which? I wish there was a visual or diagram or something to make this easier to understand. Maybe once it clicks, I'll make one...
Last edit: 16 Jul 2020 00:07 by snowgoer540.

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16 Jul 2020 00:09 #174789 by phillc54
ohmic:type is a signal name. Signal names are arbitrary and are only defined when you do a net command.
net signal_name pin_name => pin_name
the pin_ names are defined in the component
the signal_name is whatever you want it to be
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16 Jul 2020 00:19 - 16 Jul 2020 00:20 #174791 by rodw
think of a LCNC component as being a component or chip on the circuit board say a 555 timer
The pin is a leg on the chip.
By itself its not useful until its connected to another component.
Pins can be outputs or inputs.
So a signal is the arbitrary name you give when you do:
net my-sig <= motion.motion-type
So you have now connected a wire called my-sig to a leg on the motion chip ( to an output)
So now you have a wire you can connect it to as many different pins as you like just like you can daisy chain a wire in a circuit.
net my-sig =>plasmac-motion-type
net my-sig => ohmicsense.motion-type-in

I added the -in to my pin name to tell me its an input so it expects to receive an output pin from another component.
the <= and => are optional and also arbitrary. they can be left out. BUt the way I've done it, it is obvious what output is connected to my-sig and equally as obvious which inputs that signal is connected to.

I like to always make my declarations on seperate lines but Phill likes to put the signal and the input and the destination all on one line. I found some more complex lines connecting several pins at once need to be redone when I wanted to do something else with one of the pins on the line.
Last edit: 16 Jul 2020 00:20 by rodw.
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16 Jul 2020 00:22 #174792 by rodw
and outputs must be connected to inputs. You would expect that connecting one output on a circuit board could let the magic smoke out if it was connected to another output pin...
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16 Jul 2020 00:22 - 16 Jul 2020 00:28 #174793 by snowgoer540

ohmic:type is a signal name. Signal names are arbitrary and are only defined when you do a net command.
net signal_name pin_name => pin_name
the pin_ names are defined in the component
the signal_name is whatever you want it to be


I think it's the fact that they are on two different lines that confuses me.
net ohmic:type  <= motion.motion-type
net ohmic:type  => ohmicsense.motion-type-in
is the same as
net motion.motion-type => ohmicsense.motion-type-in
is that correct? or does it need to be:
net ohmic:type motion.motion-type => ohmicsense.motion-type-in
It seems like "ohmic:type" isnt needed. So I'm not sure why it needs to be there?
Last edit: 16 Jul 2020 00:28 by snowgoer540.

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16 Jul 2020 00:26 #174795 by snowgoer540

think of a LCNC component as being a component or chip on the circuit board say a 555 timer
The pin is a leg on the chip.
By itself its not useful until its connected to another component.
Pins can be outputs or inputs.
So a signal is the arbitrary name you give when you do:
net my-sig <= motion.motion-type
So you have now connected a wire called my-sig to a leg on the motion chip ( to an output)
So now you have a wire you can connect it to as many different pins as you like just like you can daisy chain a wire in a circuit.
net my-sig =>plasmac-motion-type
net my-sig => ohmicsense.motion-type-in

I added the -in to my pin name to tell me its an input so it expects to receive an output pin from another component.
the <= and => are optional and also arbitrary. they can be left out. BUt the way I've done it, it is obvious what output is connected to my-sig and equally as obvious which inputs that signal is connected to.

I like to always make my declarations on seperate lines but Phill likes to put the signal and the input and the destination all on one line. I found some more complex lines connecting several pins at once need to be redone when I wanted to do something else with one of the pins on the line.


Ok, Those examples make sense. So since Phill had made that signal in the other file, you can then hook many pins to it. I think I get it. I need to print this off and read it about 4,000 times.

Also the stuff being on different lines sometimes, and on the same line other times screws me up all the time :laugh:
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16 Jul 2020 00:27 #174796 by phillc54

or does it need to be:
net ohmic:type motion.motion-type => ohmicsense.motion-type-in

It seems like "ohmic:type" isnt needed. So I'm not sure why it needs to be there?


That is correct, you need to give the 'net' a signal name so in this case is named ohmic:type
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16 Jul 2020 00:31 - 16 Jul 2020 00:32 #174797 by snowgoer540
Ok, sorry for hijacking, we can get back on topic. I'm bookmarking this so I can read it each night before bed lol

To get back on topic, we had one vote "yes" from Tommy for an error message:

1. Should there be an error associated with trying to pulse the torch and either the float switch or the breakaway (or both) is tripped? It might alleviate some inquiries here at a later date?

Dunno, see what others think.

That seems reasonable.

Last edit: 16 Jul 2020 00:32 by snowgoer540.

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16 Jul 2020 00:38 - 16 Jul 2020 05:38 #174798 by phillc54

Ok, sorry for hijacking, we can get back on topic. I'm bookmarking this so I can read it each night before bed lol

To get back on topic, we had one vote "yes" from Tommy for an error message:

1. Should there be an error associated with trying to pulse the torch and either the float switch or the breakaway (or both) is tripped? It might alleviate some inquiries here at a later date?

Dunno, see what others think.

That seems reasonable.


While we are exercising our democratic rights:

If we do an error message should it be a popup or one of the standard GUI error messages.

I should also mention the when I did the interlock I included the float switch as that also behaves as a breakaway when not probing.
I also included the ohmic probe but I am not 100% sure if it should be included.
Last edit: 16 Jul 2020 05:38 by phillc54.

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