Retrofitting a 1986 Maho MH400E

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16 Mar 2019 21:15 #128774 by RotarySMP
Unfortunately, when I got the Boley, it only had the fine feed mechanism and the associated two change wheels. The rest of the change wheels, the pinion for the spindle and the banjos were lost.
madmodder.net/index.php/topic,7884.msg147233.html#msg147233

I did bodge up a spindle encoder and stepper mount to drive the leadscrew...
madmodder.net/index.php/topic,7884.msg129525.html#msg129525
... but only hooked up a temporary drive and PC to use it to make the first back plates. I have been torn between CNCing it properly, like you did your Holbrook with two jog wheels on the apron to still do manual turning, or getting a set of change wheels and making the banjos. I rather enjoy manual turning on a lathe.

Now that you have you Holbrook finished for a couple of years, do you find you use the jog wheels like a manual lathe for those quick 5 minute jobs where specific dimensions aren't critical?
Mark

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16 Mar 2019 21:35 #128777 by andypugh

RotarySMP wrote: Now that you have you Holbrook finished for a couple of years, do you find you use the jog wheels like a manual lathe for those quick 5 minute jobs where specific dimensions aren't critical?


No, pretty much never as it is easier to use my turn / face / thread macros.

I do use the X mpg for parting, but I will probably make a macro for that at some point.

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17 Mar 2019 00:03 #128787 by Mccartymachine1
I used two different configs for my maho. One horizontal and one vertical. Working great. Only annoying thing is switching between them in the same setup.
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17 Mar 2019 19:19 - 17 Mar 2019 19:20 #128848 by hanmon
Hi,

nice thread milling video Mark !
At the moment I'm working on this project which will be documented in Peter's CNC-Ecke :


Hanno
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Last edit: 17 Mar 2019 19:20 by hanmon.

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17 Mar 2019 20:09 #128850 by Glemigobles
Setting different machine configs for slow and fast spindles is a great option. I don't know how much you'd have to pay for a proprietary controller to be able to program that. But when it comes to spindle orientation (horizontal vs vertical) I thought you'd just use G17/18 and program the parts in CAM with the setup you want. At least that's the standard practice described in the Philips manual and the same codes are available in LinuxCNC as well.
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17 Mar 2019 21:21 #128859 by drimaropoylos

Glemigobles wrote: But when it comes to spindle orientation (horizontal vs vertical) I thought you'd just use G17/18 and program the parts in CAM with the setup you want. At least that's the standard practice described in the Philips manual and the same codes are available in LinuxCNC as well.

I thing you are right, g17,g18,g19 is a better way compared to separate configurations.
John

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19 Mar 2019 13:50 #128969 by andypugh

drimaropoylos wrote: I thing you are right, g17,g18,g19 is a better way compared to separate configurations.


Most CAM systems assume that the tool is aligned along Z (and, in fact, LinuxCNC assumes that for canned cycles) to having the spindle aligned along the system Y can often be annoying.

I will quite often MDI stuff that way anyway, but if using CAM then I have to change config.

And then there is the question of arbor-cutters . I am not sure if any of the CAM systems are very good at that...
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